01 December 2009

You Have AIDS

Today is December 1st. It is a sort of National holiday. Albeit not like Secretary's Day, or Arbor Day...We don't go around saying Happy World AIDS Day! It's certainly not a day that is to be celebrated, more a day for personal reflection. Perhaps one of the best corporate outreaches was Aldo's "If one person has AIDS, we all do." It's a shame that we do not embrace that ideology. HIV/AIDS is a disease that needs to be done away with permanently. To me it's amazing how quickly science can develop a vaccine for a new flu, or for measels, or shingles but after 2 decades there still isn't a vaccine for HIV. I know this posting is late for you to take action now but I want to challenge you to call your state Representative and Senators and tell them to step up action and actually take a proactive approach to fund research for an AIDS vaccine. This is not a "their" problem, this is our problem. If one takes the 7 degree of seperation approach I guarantee that you are indeed affected but HIV and/or AIDS. And if one has HIV/AIDS then so do you.

2 comments:

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starfish said...

TESTING OF HIV
TESTING OF DONOR BLOOD AND CELLULAR PRODUCTS USING ELISA TESTS.
Tests selected to testing donor blood and tissue must provide a high degree of confidence that HIV is not present (that is, a high sensitivity). A combination of antibody, antigen and nucleic acid tests are used by blood banks in Western countries. The World Health Organization estimated that, as of 2000, inadequate blood screening had resulted in 1 million new HIV infections worldwide.
In the USA, since 1985, all blood donations are screened with an ELISA test for HIV-1 and HIV-2, as well as a nucleic acid test. These diagnostic tests are combined with careful donor selection. As of 2001, the risk of transfusion-acquired HIV in the U.S. was approximately one in 2.5 million for each transfusion.[3]